The Limmud Chavruta Project

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        What is Chavruta? 

Chavruta means ‘partner’ and is a deeply traditional form of Jewish learning where two people explore Jewish texts together.  The learning is a dialogue between the participants, which crafts meaning and ownership of the texts.  Chavruta is not only an opportunity to increase one’s knowledge but should be a transformative experience.  Many chavrutot develop a strong connection which lasts for a lifetime.

What is the Chavruta Project?

The Limmud Chavruta Project is an international collaboration of Limmud volunteers from a diverse range of Jewish, cultural and geographical backgrounds. Every year since 1996, the Project has produced a new source book of texts exploring some aspect of Jewish life, divided into four sections.  The sources for each section are collected by a team of volunteers and then edited together by the project chair or co-chairs.

In 2009 the project went international, and there have since been teams in Canada, Israel, Austria, Hungary, the Netherlands, the UK and the USA.  The books, originally introduced for Limmud Conference in the UK, are now used at Limmud events throughout the year and around the world.

Each book embarks on an educational journey through a different theme.  The four main sections are composed of ten double-page spreads, each containing traditional Jewish texts and modern sources from other voices (Jewish, secular and from other faiths), intended to provide perspective.  There are also suggested discussion questions and connections to other texts in the book. Thousands of people in the UK and abroad are already avid users of this inspirational series.

Chavruta books for sale:

Limmud Chavruta books are excellent educational resources and great for studying at home with family and friends.  You can buy copies of previous Limmud Chavruta books for only £10 per book.  

To purchase Limmud Chavruta books or for more information, please email the Limmud Office or call +44 (0)20 3115 1620 during office hours.

Books available:

  • Money (2012)
  • The Four Elements (2011)
  • Time (2010)
  • One (2009)
  • Life (2008)
  • Creativity (2007)
  • Responsibility (2006)
  • Collection (2005)
  • Limmudim (2004)

  

Money 2012Money (2012) £10

This book was created by volunteers from Limmud Galil, Limmud UK, Limmud NY and Limmud Hungary, and edited by Robin Cooke and Robin Moss.  ‘Money’ explores Jewish attitudes to issues of wealth and finance: Prosperity; Work; Consumerism; and Tzedakah.  What is ultimately valuable?  Is work a blessing or a curse?  Is it unethical to spend lavishly?  What is the relationship between charity and justice?

The Four Elements (2011) £10

Four Elements 2011 CoverEdited by Hannah Kaye and Jeremy Tabick and put together by Limmud NY, Limmud Galil and Limmud Vienna. This book explores each of the four elements, Eretz (Earth), Mayim (Water), Ruach (Air) and Esh (Fire) and how they are used in Jewish sources. What is our relationship to the earth? Why is water a metaphor for Torah? What is the connection between ruach as soul and ruach as wind? How is God revealed through fire?

Time 2010Time (2010) £10

Launched at Limmud Conference in December 2010 and edited by Jeremy Tabick, this book also came from an international collaboration between Limmudim in the United Kingdom, New York, Galil (Israel) and the Netherlands. Sub-themes are: God's Time, My Time, Our Time and All Time. What is the nature of time, and how should we be using it, individually or as communities?

One (2009) £10

One Chavruta 2009Launched at Limmud Conference in December 2009 and edited by Hannah Kaye, this book is the result of an exciting international collaboration between Limmuds in the United Kingdom, New York, Galil (Israel) and Oz (Australia). Sub-themes are One Language, One God, One People and One World. The number One, 'Echad', is a central and pervasive theme within Jewish thought and practice, but what does it actually mean?

LifeLife (2008) £10

Edited by Yuval Keren and Abigail Wood.
This Chavruta book explores the theme of Life, examining the roots of life, the meaning of life, and preserving life and death. Do the improvements in our physical life come at the expense of our spiritual lives? How often do we take a step back and ask: what are we here for? Is it about creating a better world, or ensuring that there is a next generation to follow us? Is there some kind of life-long mission, or are the efforts of life, in the end, meaningless, as Kohelet might suggest?

  

CreativityCreativity (2007) £10

Edited by Danielle Nagler and Eloise Gluckman.
This Chavruta explores creativity in our Jewish lives. The four sections are: (1) In the beginning - in which we learn about divine creativity and its relationship to us. (2) From the sublime to the mundane - In which we learn about aspects of creativity in our daily lives. (3) Painting pictures - In which we learn about Judaism's relationship to formal artisitc creation. (4) The powers of imagination - In which we learn about creativity and individual identity.

Responsibility coverResponsibility (2006) £10

Edited by Maureen Kendler and Steve Miller. A study guide for chavruta (one-to-one) learning about Responsibility, for the world, for the Jewish community, for our family and for ourselves. (1) The world - In which we learn about being made in the image of God and examine our responsibilities to the world and all it contains. (2) Israel and the jewish people - In which we explore the relationahips and mutual responsibilities of the world wide Jewish community and the State of Israel. (3) Family and Community - In which we discuss responsibilities towards members of our family and our home communities. (4) Self and God - In which we learn about what it means to have  responsibility to ourselves and how we understand responsibility to God.

Chavruta Collection (2005) £10

collection coveredited by Maureen Kendler
A celebratory collection of individual days from four previous years.
The four sections are: (1) Zachor - Memory and action - In which we investigate the effect our memory has on our actions and vice versa. (2) Lashon - Speech - In which we look at the potential and perils of speech, consider its place in our lives, and seek to understand lashon hara and its remedy. (3) Dorot - What do parents owe their children? - In which we learn the responsibilities of being a parent and dealing with rebelliousness. (4) Ahava - Love your neighbour - In which we learn how much love we can give our neighbours and how much they are like us.

limmudim coverLimmudim (2004) £10

edited by Lindsey Taylor-Guthartz and Deborah Silver
A study guide for Chavruta learning on the theme of studying Torah.
The four sections are: (1) The dimensions of study - In which we explore the nature of study and what it involves. (2) Students - In which we discover who should study and what sort of person they should be. (3) Teachers - In which we investigate what sort of person should teach and how they should go about it. (4) Seeking God in study - In which we map the paths that lead us to encounter God in study.
 

Archive for reference, books no longer available for sale:

  • Avodah (2003)
  • Guf (2002)
  • K'dushah (2001)
  • Ahava (2000)
  • Zachor (1999)
  • Lashon (1998)
  • Dorot (1997)
  • Tzedaka (1996)

Avodah (2003)

avodah coveredited by Gila Sacks and Paul Turner
A study guide for Chavruta learning on the theme of Avodah, meaning service, slavery, worship and work.
The four sections are: (1) Slavery - In which we remember our slavery in Egypt, and consider what it means to serve man and to serve God. (2) Serving God (Avodat Hashem) - In which we ask how and why we serve God, and how this has changed. (3) Work Ethic - In which we discover a Jewish work ethic - the attitudes and values with which we approach our work. (4) Business Ethics - In which we consider how to act ethically in work, and in doing so, transform our work into service of God.

body coverGuf (2002)

edited by Claire Mandel
A study guide for Chavruta learning focused on our bodies.
The four sections are: (1) Body and ritual - In which we learn how we use our bodies in ritual. (2) Tzniut (modesty) - In which we explore the meaning and limits of modesty. (3) Body and soul - In which we consider the distinction between, and interrelationship of our body and soul. (4) Intervening with the body - In which we reflect on when we should and should not intervene with our bodies.


K'dushah (2001)

kdushah coveredited by Chani Smith

A study guide for Chavruta learning centred on holiness. 

The four sections are: (1) 'You shall be holy' - in which we investigate the nature of holiness and how to achieve it (2) 'Kiddush Hashem, Sanctifying God's Name' - in which we explore the nature of God's name and how to sanctify it (3) 'Holy time, holy place' - in which we explore holiness in time and space and how to create it (4) 'Kodesh v'chol, holy and not holy' - in which we reflect upon the importance of distinguishing between Kodesh and Chol and how they interrelate

ahava coveAhava (2000)

edited by Julian Gilbey
A study guide for Chavruta learning centred on love.
The four sections are: (1) Love your neighbour - In which we learn how much love we can give our neighbours and how much they are like us. (2) Love in relationships - In which we investigate romantic and not-so-romantic love. (3) Loving God - In which we look at ways of expressing our love for God and their underlying meanings. (4) Is love all you really need? - In which we investigate hate, jealousy and the darker side of love.

Zachor (1999)

zachor coveredited by Daniel Oppenheimer
A study guide for Chavruta learning about how we remember.
The four sections are: (1) Memory and action - In which we investigate the effect our memory has on our actions and vice versa.
(2) Commemoration - In which we look at how our historical festivals recall the past. (3) God's memory - In which we investigate this paradoxical idea means. (4) Remembering and forgetting - In which we consider the role of forgetting: both its costs and benefits.

lashon coverLashon (1998)

edited by Raphael Zarum
A study guide for Chavruta learning centred on verbal communication.
The four sections are: (1) Speech - In which we look at the potential and perils of speech, consider its place in our lives, and seek to understand lashon hara and its remedy. (2) Rechilut, Talebearing - In which we learn what happens when we tell tales and how hard it is not to do so. (3) Do it yourself rebuking: A guide to being an effective admonisher - In which we explore the dilemmas surrounding our obligation to rebuke other people. (4) Standards for media behaviour - In which we consider what Judaism has to say in contemporary debates about the behaviour of the media.

Dorot (1997)

dorot coveredited by Raphael Zarum; second edition (2003) Julian Gilbey
A study guide for Chavruta learning centred on parent-child relationships.
The five sections are: (1) What do children owe their parents? - In which we learn the responsibilities of children for parents and analyse how to act in trying circumstances; (2) What do parents owe their children? - In which we learn the responsibilities of being a parent and dealing with rebelliousness. (3) Who wants to be a parent? - In which we consider the obligation to have children and see how some biblical figures handled this. (4) Dedication to education - In which we focus on Jewish education. (5) Relating to the aged - In which we are guided on how to treat our elders.

tzedakah coverTzedaka (1996) 

edited by Jonnie Cohen
This was the first in the Chavruta series. It is a study guide on the theme of giving charity.
It is divided into four sections: (1) Who should receive tzedaka? (2) The relationship between the giver and the receiver; (3) How much to give; (4) The ultimate purpose of tzedaka.