Taste of Chavruta

 

 Introduction

Chavruta learning (learning in pairs) is one of the oldest and most powerful Jewish learning techniques. It is a wonderful, formative experience, opening people's eyes to new concepts and ideas, and helping people to forge life-long friendships.

Taste of Chavruta was a project in 5772 (2011-12), now also in 5774 (2013-2014), which seeks to make Chavruta learning even more accessible outside of Limmud events. With this in mind, the entire series of Authority is available below in pdf form, and the Shmita series will be filled up over the coming year.

Try learning them with your family at home, with colleagues at work (during a break!), with friends at the Café or over the internet, or even by yourself on your commute!

Authority (2011-2012/5772)

Taste of Chavruta investigates the theme of Authority through ten bite-sized instalments, produced over ten months by Jeremy Tabick and Frank Adam. The instalments include traditional texts (in Hebrew and English), plus relevant modern sources and some suggested points to consider.

In addition, Taste of Chavruta hopes to explore the following key questions:

  • What sorts of authority are there in ancient and modern Judaism? What about in modern society?
  • What is the source of these authorities?
  • How do we deal with conflicts between Jewish and secular authorities?
  • How do we reconcile subservience to earthly authorities with acknowledging that God's authority is ultimate?
     

Authority #1: Divine authority

Authority #2: Who rules over Me?

Authority #3: Levitical authority

Authority #4: Rabbinic authority

Authority #5: Physical authority 

Authority #6: Kingly authority

Authority #7: Sages and kings

Authority #8: Secular authority

Authority #9: Law of the land

Authority #10: It is not in heaven!

Download the complete 10 sections

 

Shmita – the sabbatical year (2013-2014/5774)

Taste of Chavruta investigates the theme of Shmita, the sabbatical year, through ten bite-sized instalments, produced over ten months by Yigal Deutscher at Hazon for Limmud. The instalments include traditional texts (in Hebrew and English), plus relevant modern sources and some suggested points to consider.

In addition, Taste of Chavruta hopes to explore the following key questions:

  • The word 'Shmita' means 'release'. What is the 'release', on a personal and societal level, that the Shmita is trying to instill?
  • What are the values at the core of the biblical sabbatical tradition? What are the challenges that might be associated with the implementation of the sabbatical tradition in this time?
  • Can we make the sabbatical vision relevant today, adapted for a modern society? If so, how?
     

Shmita #1: Letting the land rest

Shmita #2: Communal harvest

Shmita #3: Wild and perennial foods

Shmita #4: Eating local and seasonal

Shmita #5: Waste reduction

Shmita #6: Yearlong shabbat

Shmita #7: Debt release

Shmita #8: Slavery release
Shmita #9: Exile and Desolation